Walter Hoye

Erotetic Logic

In Abortion on January 23, 2012 at 12:00 am

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Erotetics

“There is nothing as deceptive as an obvious fact.” — Arthur Conan Doyle, Sr. (Scottish writer, creator of the detective Sherlock Holmes, 1859-1930)


Analysis Magnifying GlassErotetics (Greek, erõtésis, that which pertains to questions) is a part of logic that is devoted to the logical and pragmatic analysis of questions and their answers. Erotetic logic evaluates the principles that guide the presuppositions at the root of questions such as … When does a proposition answer a question (correctly or incorrectly)? What’s wrong with questions that presuppose false propositions (such as “Have you stopped beating your spouse?”)? Do questions bear truth-values? Or the question I hear from abortion minded women only steps away from the door of an abortion clinic … Will you take care of me and my baby?

Erotetic Logic

“It requires a very unusual mind to undertake the analysis of the obvious.” — Alfred North Whitehead, OM FRS (15 February 1861 — 30 December 1947)


Key Word ResearchErotetic logic starts with discerning whether or not the question … Will you take care of me and my baby? … is a syntactically proper question (i.e., a WFQ, meaning a “well-formed question”) or a syntactically improper question (i.e., an IFQ, meaning an “ill-formed question”). From here several linear paths can be taken in an attempt to understand why an abortion minded woman, only steps away from having the life of the baby in her womb terminated and the horribly dismembered body parts of her child sucked down into a biohazardous waste bag, is asking the question … Will you take care of me and my baby?

Are We Ergo an Erotetic Pro-Life Movement?

“Do the duty which lies nearest to you, the second duty will then become clearer.” — Thomas Carlyle (4 December 1795 — 5 February 1881)


Solution Magnifying GlassAs we enter the fortieth (40th) year of legalized abortion in America, the Pro-Life movement has been looking for ways to end abortion. For almost four (4) decades we have painstakingly devoted ourselves to logically and pragmatically analyzing ways to end abortion. We have employed the best minds in the world to carefully, diligently, meticulously work through the data to discover a way to end abortion. We have wrestled with the principles that guide the presuppositions at the root of the abortion debate and over the course of 14,245 days fought to elect Presidents, Representatives and Senators to hammer out a solution. As I look back at our efforts to end abortion and ponder why an abortion minded woman, only steps away from having the life of the baby in her womb terminated is asking the question … Will you take care of me and my baby? … I wonder if after all of our sermons, prayers and sacrificial giving, the reason why an abortion minded woman, is asking … Will you take care of me and my baby? … is simply because, she is in need of someone to care for her and her baby?  1

Brothers, we really need to talk.

Reference(s):
1. According to the Alan Guttmacher Institute (AGI) “the reasons women give for having an abortion underscore their understanding of the responsibilities of parenthood and family life. Three-fourths of women cite concern for or responsibility to other individuals; three-fourths say they cannot afford a child; three-fourths say that having a baby would interfere with work, school or the ability to care for dependents; and half say they do not want to be a single parent or are having problems with their husband or partner.”, May 2010, “Facts on Induced Abortion in the United States” (http://bit.ly/9GH9ch).

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