Walter Hoye

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Black American Perspectives (1)

In Abortion on January 30, 2012 at 12:00 am

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Black American Perspectives

Black American’s View The Economy Differently

“I thought a black president would make a real, actual, touchable difference in my life. He has not. But he’s trying. He inherited a mess that those awful Republicans left him. So, he deserves re-election.” — Anonymous Black American Voter, Larry Elder,· “The Black Occupy Protester — Missing In Action” 1


Black UnemploymentDespite a Black unemployment rate hovering around 16% as compared to a National unemployment rate hovering around 8%. 2 Despite a Black teenage unemployment hovering around 42%. 3 Black America feels much better about the economy than White America. According to Syndicated Columnist, Larry Elder, “a February 2011 Washington Post survey found that 24% of Blacks were ‘very’ or ‘somewhat satisfied’ with the economy, compared to 12% of Whites. A recent NBC poll found that by a lopsided 73% to 19%, most Americans considered the country on the ‘wrong track.’ But not Blacks. 49% of Blacks think the country isheaded in the right direction‘ versus 38% who do not.” 4

I wonder if the Pro-Life movement is listening?

Black American Women View Themselves Differently

“Black women haven’t really defined themselves. We were always defined as workhorses, strong. We carry the burdens, we carry the family. We don’t need. We don’t want.'” — Sophia Nelson, author of the book “Black Woman Redefined: Dispelling Myths and Discovering Fulfillment in the Age of Michelle Obama.” 5


Three Generations Of Black WomenAccording to a front page article of the Monday, January 23rd, 2012 Washington Post, “Black Women In America: Peeling Back The Labels,” a Washington Post and Kaiser Family Foundation survey of over 800 Black women, found “Religion is essential to most Black women’s lives; being in a romantic relationship is not, the poll shows. 6 Nearly three-quarters of African American women say now is a good time to be a Black woman in America, and yet a similar proportion worry about having enough money to pay their bills. Half of Black women surveyed call racism abig problem‘ in the country; nearly half worry about being discriminated against. Eighty-five percent say they are satisfied with their own lives, but one-fifth say they are often treated with less respect than other people.” 7

Here’s a summary of the article:

 · 74% Prioritize living a religious life. 
 · 68% Call career success “very important.”
 · 46% See the economic system as being “stacked against Blacks.”

I wonder if the Pro-Life movement is listening?

Black American’s View The Pro-Life Movement Differently

“Women are not blinded by their faith, and they understand the connection of abortion to other critical issues such as economic justice, the environment, racism, and caring for Black children. In fact, as one SisterSong member put it, ‘Jesus died to save us from our sins, not to save us from our minds.'” — SisterSong, “African Americans Underrepresented in Anti-Abortion Movement,” Published in Collective Voices, Vol. 2 Issue 5, Summer 2006 8


Black Woman In WhiteDespite Black women accounting for 40.2% of all abortions in the United States of America. 9 Despite abortion rates for White women decreasing and abortion rates for Black women increasing, 10 SisterSong, an organization founded in 1997, is dedicated to women of color and reproductive justice. SisterSong was built from a budget of $0 dollars to over $1 Million dollars by the Pro-Choice movement and works tirelessly to ensure that Black Americans understand how the “spectre of forced breeding” (e.g., such as during the days of slavery) in the Black community is being resurrected by the anti-abortion and anti-birth control agenda (i.e., Pro-Life movement) of White, Male, Catholic, Conservative Republicans and Democrats. While Loretta Ross will step down in 2012 as the National Coordinator for SisterSong, 11 the organization will continue to work hard to ensure the Black community understands that “attacks on abortion and birth control are cynically used to mobilize a conservative base of voters who are hostile to civil rights, human rights, LGBTQ issues, women’s rights and immigrants’ rights. But mostly, they are hostile to our Black children, pushing them out of schools and into jails.” 12

I wonder if the Pro-Life movement is listening?

Black American Views Require Black Americans

The Negro Project 1.0

Margaret Sanger In 1957 Interview With Mike Wallace“The minister’s work is also important and he should be trained, perhaps by the Federation as to our ideals and the goal that we hope to reach. We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population, and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.” — Margaret Sanger. 13

The Negro Project 1.0In 1939 Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger’s created the Negro Project14 Ryan Bomberger, Co-founder of The Radiance Foundation, says: “With the help of elite and famous African-Americans Mary McLeod Bethune, W.E.B. DuBois, and Rev. Adam Clayton Powell, Sr., the Negro Project was able to be sold as a solution to poverty and high birth rates.” 15 Indeed. Under the pretense of “better health” and “family planning,” Sanger cleverly implemented her plan to restrict, if not entirely eliminate, the Black community. Today the Negro Project is alive, well and pays the abortion industry enormously high dividends at the expense of millions of lost lives in every community.

I wonder if the Pro-Life movement is listening?

The Negro Project 2.0

“Are we willing to do for the truth what others are willing to do for a lie?” — Walter Ralston Martin (September 10, 1928 — June 26, 1989), Christian apologist who founded the Christian Research Institute in 1960.”


The Negro Project 2.0We have entered into the fortieth (40) year of legalized abortion in America and the Pro-Life movement has few strategies or tactics that appeal to or are supported by the Black community. Even though Planned Parenthood has been exposed, over and over again, as a criminal organization, she continues to be difficult to defund and next to impossible to dethrone. Why? Because Planned Parenthood invested in the Black community, she now (illegitimately) enjoys an air of “credibility” as the only organization working hard to meet the needs of poor and disenfranchised women struggling to realize the American Dream.

Walter Martin’s words just keep ringing in my ears. “Are we willing to do for the truth what others are willing to do for a lie?”

I believe so, still …

I just keep wondering if the Pro-Life movement is listening?

Brothers, we really need to talk.

Note(s):
· Laurence Allen Elder, Radio talk show host and syndicated columnist. Larry is a Republican who supports free trade, school choice, same-sex marriage, amnesty for illegal immigrants, and abortion rights (http://bit.ly/DE77a).
Reference(s):
01. Laurence Allen Elder, Syndicated Columnist, “The Black Occupy Protester — Missing In Action,” Published December 12, 2011 (http://bit.ly/slOuaA).
02. United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Economic New Release, Household Data, “Table A-2. Employment Status Of The Civilian Population By Race, Sex, And Age, Last Modified Date: January 06, 2012 (http://1.usa.gov/2ZYGjf).
03. Ibid.
04. op. cit., “The Black Occupy Protester — Missing In Action,”
05. “Survey Paints Portrait Of Black Women In America,” Washington Post, By Krissah Thompson, Published: January 22, 2012 (http://wapo.st/x6Pmk8).
06. Ibid.
07. Ibid.
08. SisterSong, “African Americans Underrepresented in Anti-Abortion Movement,” Published in Collective Voices, Vol. 2 Issue 5, Summer 2006 (http://bit.ly/xFo9nt).
09. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention “Abortion Surveillance — United States, 2008,” Surveillance Summaries November 25, 2011 / 60(SS15);1-41 (http://1.usa.gov/zXJv0q).
10. Ibid.
11. Loretta Ross, “A Message of thanks and transition from SisterSong National Coordinator, Loretta Ross,” (http://bit.ly/xF5DOR).
12. op. cit., “African Americans Underrepresented in Anti-Abortion Movement,”
13. Letter from Sanger to Dr. Clarence J. Gamble, of the soap-manufacturing company Procter and Gamble, 10 December 1939, Margaret Sanger Collection, Library of Congress (MSCLC) (http://bit.ly/zP6hgk) and/or (http://1.usa.gov/wG65PW).
14. “The Negro Project,” Margaret Sanger’s Eugenic Plan for Black Americans, By Tanya L. Green, Posted at Concerned Women of America (http://bit.ly/qARBD).
15. “The Negro Project: Poor, Black and Undesirable,” TooManyAborted.Com (http://bit.ly/cTN2ni).

Erotetic Logic

In Abortion on January 23, 2012 at 12:00 am

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Erotetics

“There is nothing as deceptive as an obvious fact.” — Arthur Conan Doyle, Sr. (Scottish writer, creator of the detective Sherlock Holmes, 1859-1930)


Analysis Magnifying GlassErotetics (Greek, erõtésis, that which pertains to questions) is a part of logic that is devoted to the logical and pragmatic analysis of questions and their answers. Erotetic logic evaluates the principles that guide the presuppositions at the root of questions such as … When does a proposition answer a question (correctly or incorrectly)? What’s wrong with questions that presuppose false propositions (such as “Have you stopped beating your spouse?”)? Do questions bear truth-values? Or the question I hear from abortion minded women only steps away from the door of an abortion clinic … Will you take care of me and my baby?

Erotetic Logic

“It requires a very unusual mind to undertake the analysis of the obvious.” — Alfred North Whitehead, OM FRS (15 February 1861 — 30 December 1947)


Key Word ResearchErotetic logic starts with discerning whether or not the question … Will you take care of me and my baby? … is a syntactically proper question (i.e., a WFQ, meaning a “well-formed question”) or a syntactically improper question (i.e., an IFQ, meaning an “ill-formed question”). From here several linear paths can be taken in an attempt to understand why an abortion minded woman, only steps away from having the life of the baby in her womb terminated and the horribly dismembered body parts of her child sucked down into a biohazardous waste bag, is asking the question … Will you take care of me and my baby?

Are We Ergo an Erotetic Pro-Life Movement?

“Do the duty which lies nearest to you, the second duty will then become clearer.” — Thomas Carlyle (4 December 1795 — 5 February 1881)


Solution Magnifying GlassAs we enter the fortieth (40th) year of legalized abortion in America, the Pro-Life movement has been looking for ways to end abortion. For almost four (4) decades we have painstakingly devoted ourselves to logically and pragmatically analyzing ways to end abortion. We have employed the best minds in the world to carefully, diligently, meticulously work through the data to discover a way to end abortion. We have wrestled with the principles that guide the presuppositions at the root of the abortion debate and over the course of 14,245 days fought to elect Presidents, Representatives and Senators to hammer out a solution. As I look back at our efforts to end abortion and ponder why an abortion minded woman, only steps away from having the life of the baby in her womb terminated is asking the question … Will you take care of me and my baby? … I wonder if after all of our sermons, prayers and sacrificial giving, the reason why an abortion minded woman, is asking … Will you take care of me and my baby? … is simply because, she is in need of someone to care for her and her baby?  1

Brothers, we really need to talk.

Reference(s):
1. According to the Alan Guttmacher Institute (AGI) “the reasons women give for having an abortion underscore their understanding of the responsibilities of parenthood and family life. Three-fourths of women cite concern for or responsibility to other individuals; three-fourths say they cannot afford a child; three-fourths say that having a baby would interfere with work, school or the ability to care for dependents; and half say they do not want to be a single parent or are having problems with their husband or partner.”, May 2010, “Facts on Induced Abortion in the United States” (http://bit.ly/9GH9ch).

Personhood: It’s Science With Boundaries

In Abortion, Personhood on January 16, 2012 at 3:25 pm

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Personhood: It’s Science Fiction

"I am the best there is at what I do … but what I do best is not very nice." — Marvel Comic’s catchphrase for Wolverine debuted September 1982.

Marvel Comics X-Men WolverineScience Fiction deals with imaginary but more or less plausible (or at least non-supernatural) content such as future settings, futuristic science and technology, space travel, aliens, and paranormal abilities. Exploring the consequences of scientific innovations is one purpose of science fiction. Science Fiction is largely based on alternative possible worlds or futures. It is similar to, but differs significantly from fantasy in as much as the imaginary elements of the story are largely possible within scientifically established or scientifically postulated laws of nature. As a child running in the streets of Detroit, Michigan, my favorite Science Fiction was Marvel Comics’ X-Men1 The X-Men are a futuristic superhero team created by writer Stan Lee and drawn by Jack Kirby that first appeared in September 1963 when I was seven (7) years old. Marvel Comics X-Men WolverineThe X-Men possessed the “X-Gene” (a gene normal humans lacked) that gave them their extraordinary mutant abilities. Over the years Wolverine became my favorite X-Man. Wolverine was literally part wolverine and part human. Wolverine possessed animal-keen senses, enhanced physical capabilities, three retracting bone claws on each hand and a healing factor that allows him to recover from virtually any wound, disease or poison at an accelerated rate. The healing factor also slowed down his aging process and enabled him to live beyond a normal human lifespan. Today, Wolverine has a near-indestructible metal alloy adamantium endoskeleton and claws. As a boy, Wolverine was my “super soldier.”

Personhood: It’s Not Science Fiction Anymore

"The term ‘creation’ is not just fanciful rhetoric: some of the research now underway involves actually altering the genetic code of soldiers, modifying bits of DNA to fashion a new type of human specimen, one that functions like a machine, killing tirelessly for days and nights on end. These mutations will ‘revolutionize the contemporary order of battle’ and guarantee ‘operational dominance across the whole range of potential United States military employments,’ the DARPA wizards enthuse." — Hunter Gatheress, Paranoia Publishing ·

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is an agency of the United States Department of Defense and is responsible for the development of new technology for use by the military. 2 According to Wired magazine’s Katie Drummond, “DARPA is looking to re-write the laws of evolution to the military’s advantage, creating “synthetic organisms” that can live forever — or can be killed with the flick of a molecular switch.” 3 According to DARPA’s 2011 budget, 4 the Pentagon is investing $6 Million into a project called BioDesign5 with the objective of eliminating “the randomness of natural evolutionary advancement.” 6 “The plan would assemble the latest bio-tech knowledge to come up with living, breathing creatures that are genetically engineered to “produce the intended biological effect.” 7DARPA wants the organisms to be fortified with molecules that bolster cell resistance to death, so that the lab-monsters can ‘ultimately be programmed to live indefinitely.'” 8 Of course DARPA is taking every precaution to create a “synthetic organism ‘self-destruct’ option (i.e., a ‘molecular kill-switch‘) to be implemented upon nefarious removal of organism.” 9 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) HeaderquartersAccording to Thomson Reuters’ Kate Kelland, in November of 2009 “Britain’s Academy of Medical Sciences launched a study Tuesday to look at the use of animals containing human material in scientific research.” 10 Martin Bobrow, a professor of medical genetics at Cambridge University says: “There is a whole raft of new scientific techniques that will make it not only easier but also more important to be able to do these cross-species experiments.” 11 In the same article, Kelland goes on to report “a row erupted in Britain over new laws allowing the creation of human-animal embryos for experimentation.” 12

"In a nutshell, the argument is that even though creating PostHumans may be a very dangerous social experiment, it is even more dangerous not to attempt it." — Assistant Professor Mark Walker, New Mexico State University, TransHumanism, Destroying The Barriers. ·

The worldwide race for technological military superiority is on. As we can plainly see now … Wolverine … my childhood “super soldier,” 13,14 is not Science Fiction anymore.

Personhood: It’s Science With Boundaries

"All of the boundaries are up for grabs. All of the boundaries that have defined us as human beings, boundaries between a human being and an animal and between a human being and a super human being or a god." — Professor Leon R. Kass, former Chairman, President’s Council on Bioethics, TransHumanism, Destroying The Barriers. ·

TransHumanism. A New Form Of Human Life.Science without boundaries is madness. Just because we can do something does not mean we should. So to ensure we are always talking about “human beings” and not about cross-species experiments, human-animal embryos, living, breathing super soldiers, animals or those of us that can physically demonstrate “rational attributes” and “sentience” on demand, I inserted the word “only” in the 2012 version of the language for the California Human Rights Amendment. Personhood is not simply a Pro-Life tactic to establish legal rights for the child in the womb or a “no-holds-barred” uphill charge to the front door of the United States Supreme Court in an effort to overturn Roe v. Wade … No! … It’s about man being made in the image of God. It’s about God breathing into man His breath of life and man becoming a living soul. It’s about recognizing the inestimable value, the inherent dignity and the incomprehensible quality of all human life. It’s about equality, justice and freedom, regardless of the means by which a human being was procreated, method of reproduction, age, race, sex, gender, physical well-being, function, or condition of physical or mental dependency and/or disability. For once and for all time, it’s about the God given right to Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness for every human being.

Brothers, we really need to talk.

Note(s):
· Hunter Gatheress, “The DARPA War Fighter Enhancement Programs” (http://bit.ly/zsHB5Y).
· TransHumanism, Destroying The Barriers, with Tom Horn, an approximately 60 minute DVD (http://bit.ly/oChCoS).
Reference(s):
01. Marvel Entertainment, LLC a wholly-owned subsidiary of The Walt Disney Company, is one of the world’s most prominent character-based entertainment companies, built on a proven library of over 8,000 characters featured in a variety of media over seventy years (http://bit.ly/bycopQ).
02. “DARPA’s mission is to maintain the technological superiority of the U.S. military and prevent technological surprise from harming our national security by sponsoring revolutionary, high-payoff research bridging the gap between fundamental discoveries and their military use (http://www.darpa.mil).
03. Katie Drummond, “Pentagon Looks to Breed Immortal ‘Synthetic Organisms,’ Molecular Kill-Switch Included”, Wired Magazine, Category: DarpaWatch, February 5, 2010 (http://bit.ly/bDhCJG).
04. “Department of Defense Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 President’s Budget” (http://bit.ly/w8OBzC).
05. Ibid., Page 264 (Search on “BioDesign“)
06. Ibid., Page 265 (Search on “BioDesign“)
07. op. cit., Katie Drummond
08. op. cit., Katie Drummond
09. op. cit., Department of Defense Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 President’s Budget, Page 265 (Search on “BioDesign“).
10. Kate Kelland “Scientists Want Debate On Animals With Human Genes”, Reuters, November 9th, 2009 (http://reut.rs/fquN9W).
11. Ibid.
12. Ibid.
13. Moreno, Jonathan D. (2006). “Mind Wars: Brain Research and National Defense.” Dana Press, ISBN 1932594167.
14. Goldblatt, Michael (2002). “DARPA’s programs in enhancing human performance”. In Roco, Mihail C.; Bainbridge, William Sims. Managing Nano-Bio-Info-Cogno Innovations: Converging Technologies in Society (1st Edition). Arlington, VA: Springer. pp. 339-340. ISBN 1402041063.: cited in McIntosh, Daniel (December 2008). “Human, TransHuman, PostHuman: Implications of Evolution-By-Design for Human Security”. Journal of Human Security 4 (3): 4-20.

Personhood: Acknowledges I Am Somebody

In Abortion, Personhood on January 9, 2012 at 12:00 am

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Personhood: I Am Somebody

William Holmes BordersWilliam H. Borders ·

I Am Somebody.” is a poem written in the 1950s by Reverend William Holmes Borders, Sr. (1905-1993), Senior Pastor at Wheat Street Baptist Church and civil rights activist in Atlanta where he campaigned for civil rights and distinguished himself as a charismatic spokesperson for the city’s poor and dispossessed. 1 In 1971, a bold and unapologetically Pro-Life Jesse Jackson 2 recited his version of the poem on Sesame Street to emphasize the individuality and significance of all people, regardless of size, appearance, race, or economic status. The scene took place on the stoop of 123 Sesame Street, involving a large group of children of different colors, who together and in chorus joined in on the now legendary “I Am Somebody.” portions of the poem. 3

Here is the poem as we take a walk down memory lane:

William Holmes Borders"I am Somebody! I am Somebody! I may be poor, But I am Somebody. I may be young, But I am Somebody. I may be on welfare, But I am Somebody. I may be small, But I am Somebody. I may have made mistakes, But I am Somebody. My clothes are different, My face is different, My hair is different, But I am Somebody. I am Black, Brown, or White. I speak a different language But I must be respected, protected, never rejected. I am God’s child!" — Reverend Jesse Jackson recited this poem on Sesame Street in 1971. Yasmin Brown was featured in this episode.

Personhood: Understands I Am Somebody

PERSONHOOD IN BLACK AMERICA is not simply a Pro-Life strategy or tactic that establishes legal rights for all human beings at all stages of our development. There is a much deeper desire within the hearts of the disenfranchised to be accepted, approved, acknowledged, affirmed and have the attention of the supreme and highest law of the land as a person than there is a desire to overturn Roe v. Wade.

I AM SOME BODY.”

PERSONHOOD IN BLACK AMERICA speaks to equal treatment under the law that without compromise or prejudice, recognizes all of us as human beings entitled to an equality, a freedom, a brotherhood, a type of justice that ensures access to entrepreneurship, full and fair employment opportunities, decent housing, integrated education and culture, health care, child care, clothing and three meals a day.

I AM SOME BODY.”

PERSONHOOD IN BLACK AMERICA speaks to a day where men, women, boys and girls are “not judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character” 4 and “the tired, poor and huddled masses yearning to breathe free” 5 can look to a brighter future as they walk through the “Golden Door” of the American dream.

I AM SOME BODY.”

PERSONHOOD IN BLACK AMERICA speaks to the heartfelt need for the highest and supreme law of our land to be amended with words so clearly defined that they are absent of “interposition and nullification” 6 so that a person is a person “regardless of the means by which they were procreated, method of reproduction, age, race, sex, gender, physical well-being, function, or condition of physical or mental dependency and/or disability” 7 unto death.

I AM SOME BODY.”

PERSONHOOD IN BLACK AMERICA speaks to the need to have the words “we hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness” 8 apply to all human life and not just some human life.

I AM SOME BODY.”

PERSONHOOD IN BLACK AMERICA understands that “the law cannot make a man love me, but it can keep him from lynching me” 9 and because we “think that is pretty important,” 10 seeks to ensure all human beings, from the child in the womb, to the senior citizen facing end of life decisions, to the disabled war veteran are protected by love and by law.

I AM SOME BODY.”

I hope the Pro-Life movement is listening.

It’s not just about an “all hands on deck” effort to overturn Roe v. Wade.

Personhood: Acknowledges I Am Somebody

"I am a true Christian, for indeed, I practiced the religion of Jesus at points better than my master from whom I learned it." — Reverend William Holmes Borders. This is the last sentence in his poem “I Am Somebody” introduced in 1943. ·

1963 March on Washington WomenWomen in the 1963 March On Washington

Personhood is a movement working to respect the God given right to life by recognizing all human beings as persons who are “created in the image of God” 11 without exceptions. Personhood brings to light the internationally recognized and well documented truth regarding the beginning of our biological development, 12 and by definition and design sets the stage for a complete victory. Personhood defines “winning” in a way that meets the physical, spiritual and emotional needs of men, women and children everywhere and for all time. Personhood understands I Am Somebody. Personhood gets it.

1963 March on Washington WomenWomen in the 1963 March On Washington

It’s time the Pro-Life movement stops fighting Pro-Lifers, recognizes that there are different Spiritual Gifts, but only one Holy Gift Giver 13 and stand together united for the greater good of all humanity. For one, I believe the Pro-Life movement can work together as we stand for life. Like Martin Luther King, Jr., “I refuse to accept the idea that the ‘isness’ of man’s present nature makes him morally incapable of reaching up for the eternal ‘oughtness’ that forever confronts him.” 14 I may be poor. I may be young. I may be on welfare. I may be small. I may have made mistakes. My clothes may be different. My face may be different. My hair may be different. I may be Black, Brown, or White. I may speak a different language than you, but I Am Somebody. I must be respected. I must be protected. I must never be rejected. I am a child of God!

Brothers, we really need to talk.

Note(s):
· William Holmes Borders, first penned “I Am Somebody.” He introduced his poem to the world on Sunday, January 10, 1943. The African American Lectionary provides both the history and the full text of his original work (http://bit.ly/Ag6jt3).
Reference(s):
01. William Holmes Borders (1905-1993), (http://bit.ly/dc84Vo).
02. “How we respect life is the over- riding moral issue,” by Jesse Jackson; Right to Life News, January 1977 (http://bit.ly/n6O0n0).
03. Although the Reverend Jesse Jackson did not write the poem: “I Am Somebody” it became almost a calling card for him. He has recited the line in movies and other individuals in movies and songs have used his recitation of the poem. The full text was included in the book Sesame Street Unpaved.
04. “I Have a Dream” (1963) is the most widely known of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speeches and was delivered from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963 at the March for Jobs & Freedom, generally referred to as the March on Washington (http://bit.ly/mW7f5O).
05. The Message of the State of Liberty inscribed on the tablet that the “Mother of Exiles” is carrying (http://bit.ly/N6rhA).
06. op.cit. Dr. King’s 1963 “I Have a Dream” speech.
07. The language of the California Human Rights Amendment (http://www.iamaperson.us).
08. In Congress, July 4, 1776, The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen United States of America (http://bit.ly/bPqF8f).
09. Martin Luther King, Jr., “It may be true that the law cannot make a man love me, but it can keep him from lynching me, and I think that’s pretty important.” Quoted in The Wall Street Journal, Nov. 13, 1962.
10. Ibid.
11. Genesis 1:27 (KJV): “So God created man in his own image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them.” (http://bit.ly/4oRJs6).
12. Carnegie Stages of Early Human Embryonic Development (http://1.usa.gov/uXOwVZ).
13. 1st Corinthians 12:4(KJV): “Now there are diversities of gifts, but the same Spirit.” (http://bit.ly/e8OPks).
14. Martin Luther King, Jr., Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech, Oslo, Norway, 1964, (http://bit.ly/p7Unnx).

Personhood: Is Being Human Enough?

In Abortion, Personhood on January 2, 2012 at 12:01 am

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Personhood: The Fact Of Existing

"I perceived clearly that I was participating in a truly significant historic event in which a consensus had been reached as to the supreme value of the human person, a value that did not originate in the decision of a worldly power, but rather in the fact of existing—which gave rise to the inalienable right to live free from want and oppression and to fully develop one’s personality." — Hernán Santa Cruz of Chile, member of the drafting sub-Committee of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. ·

Personhood: Is Being Human Enough?

Hernan Santa CruzHernán Santa Cruz of Chile

The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR)” was adopted Friday, December 10th, 1948 and is understood to be the foundation of international human rights law. The PREAMBLE makes clear that the “recognition of the inherent dignity and of the equal and inalienable rights of all members of the human family is the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.” Since its adoption more than 80 international human rights treaties, declarations, conventions, bills, provisions have formed a comprehensive and legally binding power for the promotion and protection of human rights. However, simply being a member of the “human family” or “the fact of existing” is not enough to be covered by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Today special interests groups have taken the lead in defining the body of international human rights law by promoting their own agendas to address concerns such as racial discrimination, torture, enforced disappearances, disabilities, and the rights of women, children, migrants, minorities, and indigenous peoples.

Personhood: Before As Well As After Birth

"WHEREAS the child, by reason of his physical and mental immaturity, needs special safeguards and care, including appropriate legal protection, before as well as after birth." — Declaration of the Rights of The Child, Adopted by UN General Assembly Resolution 1386 (XIV) of 10 December 1959 ·

Personhood: Human Rights and the Unborn Child

Rita JosephRita Joseph, Australia

Rita Joseph has lectured at the John Paul II Institute for Marriage and Family Studies in Melbourne, Australia and represented family concerns at United Nation (U.N.) conferences. In her masterpiece, Human Rights and the Unborn Child, Rita successfully argues that the right to life of the child in the womb is clearly defined in the U.N. Declaration of the Rights of the Child (1959). 1 Rita is on record as saying the right to life of the child in the womb has “been obscured for some decades now by the rise of a new pro-abortion ideology in the form of radical feminism” and such forces have conducted “a masterly campaign of ideological reinterpretation.” 2 Rita adds that the word “child” was understood in 1948 to include the child in the womb, (see the quotes above) and references the historical and legal prohibitions on aborting any woman “with child” and the original Hippocratic prohibition on abortion which was reaffirmed by the World Medical Association’s Declaration of Geneva only three months before the Universal Declaration of Human Rights: “I will maintain the utmost respect for human life from the time of conception, even under threat …” 3 If you’re reading this column and know Rita, tell her I said “Thank You!” Her commitment to the child in the womb reflects a deep and abiding love for Christ. I’m hoping we can meet and talk one day.

Personhood: The Morality Of The 21st Century

"The morality of the 21st century will depend on how we respond to this simple but profound question: Does every human life have equal moral value simply and merely because it is human?" — Wesley J. Smith, Featured on Starbuck’s take-away coffee cups as part of its “The Way I See It” 2006 Campaign ·

Personhood: Again, Is Being Human Enough?

Wesley J. Smith, J.D.Wesley J. Smith, J.D.

In 2010, Lori and I were invited to a Napa Wine Cave to hear the latest on Proposition 8 (Traditional Marriage) from the lawyers themselves. The cave was awesome, the meeting was attended by both National and Statewide leaders and very, very informative. Still, my heart was broken in that meeting. One panel discussion opened this way: “We do not want to make the same mistake the Pro-Life movement is making. Millions of lives have been lost since 1973. RIGHT HERE and RIGHT NOW — is our 1973 and we will not settle for ‘Domestic Partnerships’ or ‘Civil Unions!’ We will stand together and stand without compromise for traditional marriage. One Man. One Woman. For Life.” I cried. Not because I did not agree with the statement. I cried because the statement was true. Millions of lives have been lost since 1973 and the Pro-Life movement is fighting over strategy and tactics. It’s Personhood versus Overturning Roe v. Wade. Why? We need both. Furthermore, we can have both because our God shall supply all our needs according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus 4 (Philippians 4:19). If the morality of the 21st century depends on how we respond to this question: “Does every human life have equal moral value simply and merely because it is human?” If we believe that every human life has equal moral value. If we believe that being human is enough. If we want to avoid thirty-nine (39) more years of legalized abortion on demand. Then perhaps ending abortion in 2012 will depend upon us seeing the value of meeting the physical and heartfelt needs of men, women and children 5 (James 2:15,16), preferring one before another, doing nothing by partiality 6 (1st Timothy 5:21) and working together as brothers and sisters in the Body of Christ “simply and merely because” we are human.

Brothers, we really need to talk.

Note(s):
· The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which was adopted by the UN General Assembly on 10 December 1948, was the result of the experience of the Second World War (http://bit.ly/SqjvG).
· Declaration of the Rights of the Child, G.A. res. 1386 (XIV), 14 U.N. GAOR Supp. (No. 16) at 19, U.N. Doc. A/4354 (1959), (http://bit.ly/vQVCL2).
· Wesley J. Smith, Featured on Starbuck’s take-away coffee cups as part of its “The Way I See It” 2006 Campaign (http://bit.ly/b83dKq).
Reference(s):
01. Women for Faith & Family, Voices Editorial Board, Rita Joseph (http://bit.ly/s1jVJ4).
02. “International Human-Rights Law and the Unborn Child”, by John Keown, September 24, 2010, (http://bit.ly/cK8JjV).
03. Ibid.
04. Philippians 4:19: “But my God shall supply all your need according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus.” (http://bit.ly/rFcJsR).
05. James 2:15,16: “If a brother or sister be naked, and destitute of daily food, And one of you say unto them, Depart in peace, be ye warmed and filled; notwithstanding ye give them not those things which are needful to the body; what doth it profit?” (http://bit.ly/tShYqU).
06. 1st Timothy 5:21: “I charge thee before God, and the Lord Jesus Christ, and the elect angels, that thou observe these things without preferring one before another, doing nothing by partiality.” (http://bit.ly/vuYCim).