Walter Hoye

No Escaping Slavery

In Abortion on July 25, 2011 at 12:00 am

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No Escaping Slavery

“If your mother was a slave, then you would be born a slave. If your mother was free, then you would be born free.” — Frantz Emmanuel Kebreau, National Speaker and Author of “Stolen History1


Virginia 1662 LawVirginia was one of the first states to acknowledge slavery in its laws, initially enacting such a law in 1661. However, in 1662 the American Colony of Virginia enacted a law of hereditary slavery meaning that a child born to an enslaved mother inherits her slave status. This law would have a profound effect on the continuance of slavery, even after the slave trade was abolished in 1863.

Here is the law in the old english of its day:

Act XII
Negro Womens Children To Serve
According To The Condition Of The Mother.

“WHEREAS some doubts have arrisen whether children got by any Englishman upon a Negro woman should be slave or free, Be it therefore enacted and declared by this present grand assembly, that all children borne in this country shalbe held bond or free only according to the condition of the mother, And that if any christian shall committ ffornication with a Negro man or woman, hee or shee soe offending shall pay double the ffines imposed by the former act.” 2

While Slavery has existed for all times, this law officially recognized Slavery as an institution that needed to be defined, controlled and regulated.

Escaping Slavery

“All the early Black Congressmen (and senators) were members of the Republican party. This is because the Republicans, exemplified by President Abraham Lincoln, were the party in office during the Civil War and many abolitionists belonged to the Republican Party. The Democrats were opposed to all attempts to banish slavery.” — The Indigenous People of Africa and America (IPOAA) Magazine 3

First Black United States CongressmenThese seven (7) Black Republican Congressmen, Hiram Rhodes Revels of Mississippi, Benjamin S. Turner of Alabama, Jefferson F. Long of Georgia, Robert C. De Large, Robert Brown Elliott, and Joseph H. Rainey of South Carolina, and Josiah T. Walls of Florida were all born long before January 1st, 1863. To reach their positions, all seven (7) conquered virtually insurmountable odds fighting the Ku Klux Klan, extreme poverty, little to no political equity and the lack of “Due Process” and “Equal Protection” courtesy of the United States Supreme Court’s decision to eviscerate the 14th Amendment (adopted on July 9th, 1868) by way of the Slaughter-House cases in 1873. 4

It now appears we’ve moved from Slavery to Freedom.

No Escaping Slavery

“I freed thousands of slaves. I could have freed thousands more, if they had known they were slaves.” — Harriet Tubman (c. 1822 – 10 March 1913), also known as Black Moses, was an African-American abolitionist.


Doe v. Bolton 1973Doe v. Bolton, 410 U.S. 179, was a landmark decision of the United States Supreme Court that was released on January 22nd, 1973, the same day as Roe v. Wade. With this decision, the Supreme Court authorized the abortion business to take the life of a child in his or her own mother’s womb, even after the baby has reached viability (i.e., the ability of a child to live outside the mother’s womb with artificial aid), based solely upon the condition of the mother, in order to protect her physical, emotional, psychological, familial well being, and/or age limitations. 5

Is it only me or does this sound familiar to you too?

Escaping Slavery

Black Pro-Life CoalitionThe National Black Pro-Life Coalition is a growing network of Pro-Life and Pro-Family organizations committed to restoring a culture that celebrates Life, Family and Hope in the Black Community. Our goal, without apology and/or compromise, is to end abortion. Through education and awareness media campaigns, community events, political action, lobbying and coalition building of Pro-Life and Pro-Family advocacy groups with Biblical Worldviews, we will restore Life, Family and Hope in the Black Community. 6

Full circle, cycling from Slavery to Freedom and back to Slavery all over again and again and again ends here.

Join us.

Brothers, we really need to talk.

Reference(s):
1. Frantz Emmanuel Kebreau, “A Case for Life…Unbelievable but True!!” (http://on.fb.me/oDgIV6).
2. Act XII, Laws of Virginia, December 1662, Hening, Statutes at Large, 2: 170, (http://1.usa.gov/pMnhrJ).
3. IPOAA Magazine, “First Black Congressmen” (http://bit.ly/pLllu6).
4. Philip Dray, “Capitol Men: The Epic Story Of Reconstruction Through The Lives Of The First Black Congressmen” (http://bit.ly/ptbp3X).
5. Doe v. Bolton (No. 70-40), Cornell University Law School (http://bit.ly/nfTas2).
6. The National Black Pro-Life Coalition (http://bit.ly/lqIlJO).

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